minerva cerda

Do you notice any similarities in the way social class is discussed in readings 4.1 and 4.2? Do you notice any differences in the way these two readings DIFFERENTIATE between social classes

-in both articles income is describe by annually income. the articles do have a differences and thats most people are middle class because they work hard to get their income to a higher and upper class but they aren’t investing as much as an upper class. 

Pick the station closest to where you live. Using the concepts from Reading 4.1, what social class tends to live in your neighborhood? Are you surprised (or not) by the answer? Do you feel it is an accurate representation of the people living in your neighborhood?

-I live by the J train, in my neighborhood we are a median working class. I am surprised because the people that live over here have nice car and houses and I thought that it would be a higher class. Also the rent here is expensive. No I don’t feel like its and accurate representation of the people that live here.

Based on Reading 4.2, do you notice a general pattern about social classes in NYC?

-there is a general pattern when it comes to the train lines. The upper class or the middle class live around downtown Brooklyn and Manhattan and the poor and the working class live every where else. 

DB 4.1 – Justine Lazdina

Do you notice any similarities in the way social class is discussed in readings 4.1 and 4.2? Do you notice any differences in the way these two readings DIFFERENTIATE between social classes?

  • In both readings social class was defined by the yearly income of a household. The readings differentiated slightly in two ways; 4.1 mentioned that social class is very subjective and, besides income, people also consider ones education and upbringing.

Pick the station closest to where you live. Using the concepts from Reading 4.1, what social class tends to live in your neighborhood? Are you surprised (or not) by the answer? Do you feel it is an accurate representation of the people living in your neighborhood?

  • I live on the D line, and I wasn’t too surprised to see that the average yearly income of a household was around $59,000. This would be considered middle-class, and I somewhat agree with that assessment. I agree somewhat because this is a quite, safe neighborhood with many private homes, which is a fairly common thing for middle class neighborhoods. I disagree somewhat, as well, because there are many immigrants that live in my neighborhood, and a fair amount are not documented, so their income level will not be taken into consideration. Since their income is usually less than $59,000. this would make the medium income for the neighborhood considerably lower.

Based on Reading 4.2, do you notice a general pattern about social classes in NYC?

  • There is definitely a general pattern when it comes to social class and NYC subway lines; the wealthier people cluster around Downtown Brooklyn and Manhattan and the less wealthy live outside of these “prestigious” areas.

DB 4.1 Kayla Zagal

  1. Do you notice any similarities in the way social class is discussed in readings 4.1 and 4.2? Do you notice any differences in the way these two readings differentiate between social classes? In 4.1 reading, term “social class” is used in American culture but is not well-defined or well-understood. Low to high, based on income, wealth, power, culture, behavior, heritage, and prestige. Word “class” appended after terms such as working, or ruling. Where people put themselves into categories. Income is a powerful determinant of the social class. Age makes a difference. Social class identification by household income. Categories by lower, working, middle, upper-middle, and upper. Educational level. College graduate level between those who are working class and those who are not. Depends on where you finished school, high school degree middle class edges out working class. People living in rural areas are less likely to identify in a higher social class compared with those living in urban and suburban areas. But in reading 4.2, it has a different approach than reading 4.1 because it’s about median household income with the subway and individual subway lines. Poverty to considerable wealth.
  2. Pick the station closest to where you live. Using the concepts from Reading 4.1. what social class tends to live in your neighborhood? Are you surprised (or not) by the answer? Do you feel it is an accurate representation of the people living in your neighborhood? The station closest to where I live is 77 street in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn and the train line is R. Median household income is 71,904 and I found surprising how it was higher than the last two stops the train makes. In the chart, the line increased by a little bit.
  3. Based on reading 4.2, do you notice a general pattern about social classes in NYC? I can tell a big pattern with the different boroughs. The reason with this statement is it depends how the people live like. Manhattan where it’s so expensive so the income is higher. Queens tends to decrease the income. I feel like the people living in different boroughs make the social class different as well. It could be the Hispanics and Latinos where they are in lower and middle classes, finding where it’s better to live in their place at life.

DB 4.1 Morgan Taylor

  1. Do you notice any similarities in the way social class is discussed in readings 4.1 and 4.2? Do you notice any differences in the way these two readings DIFFERENTIATE between social classes?

Similarly, both readings discuss income, but 4.1 discusses the fact that social class is a subjective categorization, and that while how people identify correlates with their income, it also strongly correlates with their level of education. 4.1 also explains that even within the highest earning group, people still identify more closely with a upper- or middle class name rather than just upper class.

  1. Pick the station closest to where you live. Using the concepts from Reading 4.1, what social class tends to live in your neighborhood? Are you surprised (or not) by the answer? Do you feel it is an accurate representation of the people living in your neighborhood?

I picked the 1, and at my stop the median household earning in 2011 was $43,805. This means that most likely people would identify as working or middle class. I don’t think this is a fair representation of the people living in my neighborhood, because I think the cost of living in NYC is much higher than the averages 4.1 considers.

  1. Based on Reading 4.2, do you notice a general pattern about social classes in NYC?

Based on 4.2, it is easy to see that wealth distribution along subway lines correlates with neighborhoods. “Upper class” New Yorkers tend to live in Downtown Manhattan or Downtown Brooklyn, while the farther out from lower and mid-Manhattan you go, people tend to have lower median household incomes.

Discussion 4.1- Jasmin Amigon

  1. Do you notice any similarities in the way social class is discussed in readings 4.1 and 4.2? Do you notice any differences in the way these two readings DIFFERENTIATE between social classes?

Income is a powerful determinant in where one lands on the social class. Age is also a factor in where one places themselves on the social class scale. I noticed that one’s urban, rural, or suburban residence aslo has a role in how social class functions in our society. For example, in the reading “Inequality and New York’s Subway” we were able to identify one’s medium household income depending on their residence on the subway map. 

  1. Pick the station closest to where you live. Using the concepts from Reading 4.1, what social class tends to live in your neighborhood? Are you surprised (or not) by the answer? Do you feel it is an accurate representation of the people living in your neighborhood?

The closest station to where I live is the N train Astoria Blvd. It appears on the chart to be a median household income of $56,154 which puts my neighborhood on the working and middle class. This information doesn’t surprise me because I have noticed The cost of living in Astoria is getting rather high due to the commercialization and new developments. I feel like the data is an accurate representation of the people living in my neighborhood. 

  1. Based on Reading 4.2, do you notice a general pattern about social classes in NYC?

I noticed that on the N train line ending uptown the incomes are relatively around 50 thousand but going towards downtown  Brooklyn the lowest median income is $26,719. The highest median income on the N line is on 5th av being $171,000 which isn’t surprising because it is in the city.

Nikita Vasilyev – D.B. 4.1

  1. It seems that both articles see social classes through income distribution and separate the public into 5 classes: lower, working, middle, upper-middle, and upper. While the New Yorker article used median household income for their argument, the Gallup article focused on subjective social class, i.e., given 5 classes, what class would people assign themselves to.
  2. After I picked Myrtle-Wyckoff station on the L train, I saw a median reading of $37,885 which splits my neighborhood into working class people and people that consider themselves to be a part of middle class. The statistics used in New Yorker article is 10 years old, but it still holds – our neighborhood Is homogenous without areas of extreme wealth or poverty. Now, I believe the map might not be as accurate now since certain station like Dekalb Ave and Jefferson Street are marketed higher due to their proximity to the city or entertainment venues. 
  3. After spending some time studying the map, I am sure that the upper class resides mostly in Manhattan, specifically near transportation hubs or in areas with picturesque views. Lower- and working-class people tend to live further back from the city centers while middle and upper middle class inhabits culturally significant or trendy areas of New York City.

Ignacio Salas on Social Classes

1. The similarities about how social class is discussed comes when mostly talking about income, and how you can find certain type of class in a respective area, but in reading 4.1, the difference is that they define class as a way of hierarchy seen in American culture and split into two:

  • Objective social class, based on the things people own, like income, education, and occupation.
  • Subjective social class, based strictly on how people see themselves.

2. The closest station to where I live is 36th Ave. in Astoria on the N train line, I’m not surprised by the answer as the median rent is $2300 and the people who lives around are mostly, people who work for the service industry, graduates who work for the film industry or people who own restaurants or work in real estate, being a good mix of working and middle class.

3. The pattern is that the people with higher income (higher class) tend to live in areas closer to where hedge funds are or areas where you find people related to the fashion industry, either very close to Manhattan or in Manhattan. However, the income inequality is very noticeable the further you go from Manhattan more into the outskirts of the metropolitan area, where in some cases the difference between incomes can easily be $100,000. The data

DB 4.1/Social Class Categories

  1. The main similarities I noticed between readings 4.1 and 4.2 were social class categories based on income levels and residential location. One difference I noticed was that reading 4.2 did not mention other factors such as education levels, political parties etc. Also reading 4.2 does not really define social classes solely based on the incomes listed. It merely shows the relationship between residential location and and income.

2. I live in Brooklyn near the J train at Broad Junction. The median income reported was $51,691. I suppose that could fall anywhere between lower and up to middle class. I think there that does represent a good amount of residents of the East New York area. However, there are people who live there with their own business and college education too. Although their income levels may not scream upper-middle to upper class. 

3. A general pattern I noticed was income in the 200K+ levels were mainly associated with lower manhattan. The lowest incomes were associated with mostly Brooklyn and Queens. I think people already expected higher incomes to be in Manhattan so that wasn’t very surprising. I was shocked to see such low incomes in Queens and Brooklyn and some parts of Upper Manhattan. Incomes as low as 16k we’re reported! And these are working people as well. 

4.1

Do you notice any similarities in the way the social class is discussed in readings 4.1 and 4.2? Do you notice any differences in the way these two readings DIFFERENTIATE between social classes?

The similarity in how the social class is discussed between readings 4.1 and 4.2 is how the income is used to separate communities in different categories such as low, middle, and upper class. And a difference from readings 4.1 and 4.2 is how reading 4.1 goes more in detail about how wealth, power, culture, conduct, heritage, and prestige are all aspects of a person’s life.

Pick the station closest to where you live. Using the concepts from Reading 4.1, what social class tends to live in your neighborhood? Are you surprised (or not) by the answer? Do you feel it is an accurate representation of the people living in your neighborhood?

From reading 4.2, I picked the one train since this is close to where I live. According to reading 4.2, the social class that tends to live in my neighborhood is the working class. I’m not surprised by this. I feel like this is an accurate representation of the people living in my community.

Based on Reading 4.2, do you notice a general pattern about social classes in NYC?

Based on reading 4.2, I notice that Manhattan’s average income is higher than the other ones. I feel like it also has to do with tourists, that most people that come to NYC stay in Manhattan.

Discussion Board 4.1 Hongtao Fu

  1. Do you notice any similarities in the way the social class is discussed in readings 4.1 and 4.2? Do you notice any differences in the way these two readings DIFFERENTIATE between social classes?

The similarities are clear, both readings used income to determine the social class structure. Reading 4.1 dives deeper than income difference. Also discussed other factors that may affect perceived social class. Factors like education, race, environments, and political partisanship.

2. Pick the station closest to where you live. Using the concepts from Reading 4.1, what social class tends to live in your neighborhood? Are you surprised (or not) by the answer? Do you feel it is an accurate representation of the people living in your neighborhood?

I used to live in 101st in Queens, where the median income is $42,169. I think it is more along the line of the working class. I don’t think it is too surprising, but it does make me wonder how do people living there afford those houses next to the train station. I think it might be less accurate because as far as I know many people there are working off the book job and they are not represented in the chart.

3. Based on Reading 4.2, do you notice a general pattern about social classes in NYC?

I noticed Manhattan is where most of the wealth gathered. However, even in Manhattan, the chart can be really bumpy. Ranging from $200,000 a year to $75,000 the next station. Meaning that even social class is somewhat distrubted by boroughs. By that I mean Manhattan contains mostly middle to upper class while Queens contains lower and working class. The social class difference is visible on the neighborhood scale.