D.B. 13 – Justine Lazdina

According to MLK, how can we tell the difference between just and unjust laws? Understanding this question is the most important part of this module, and I will ask it again during our second exam.

  • According to MLK, we can tell the difference between just and unjust laws by seeing if they uplift or degrade the individual. A law that uplifts, is a law that is morally sound and does not impede on the rights of others. A law that degrades is a law that is morally corrupt and does impede on the rights of others.

In your view, is this an important distinction (between just and unjust laws), do you think it makes a difference in the way someone (as an individual, or our society as a whole) lives their lives? Can it affect our politics?

  •  In my view, this is a very important distinction between just and unjust laws. Just because something is an accepted law does not make it right, does not make it morally sound, and therefore should not be followed. I think that it does make a difference in the way a person lives their lives AND how a society as a whole functions. Following unjust laws makes for an unjust society. If a law unfairly targets one group, but not another, the group it targets will be forced to act different for fear of reprisal.  Not surprisingly, this can create animosity between individuals and groups in a society, which in turn can have an affect on our politics.

Based on our discussion of Question 1, give an example each, of an unjust and just law, in the US today. Explain what makes it unjust or just (using MLK’s definition of those two types of laws).

  • An example of an unjust law in the US today would be the criminalization of marijuana. Marijuana has not only shown to be safer to use than alcohol, but it has also shown to have therapeutic properties. It is morally wrong to imprison marijuana users for choosing to use a substance that is not harming them nor others around them, but could in fact be helping with anxiety, eating disorders, and pain.
  • And example of a just law in the US today would be The Civil Rights Law. This is a moral law that protects the right of all individuals to be treated equally. It does not impede on the rights of others, it only lifts individuals and society up.

Zhongquan

  1. Martin Luther King believed that a law is just or not based on ethics, any law that enhances character is just, and any law that degrades character is unjust. And an unjust law is a law that is imposed on a minority. For example, apartheid policy is an unjust law
  2. I am fond of telling people that the law is the minimum moral. It does not tell what to do like religion does. The law says that a person cannot do something without being punished. Therefore, the purpose of law is to protect order, and justice is only one of the by-products of the process of maintaining order, but of course there are also other products. Justice is a value judgment that falls under the category of morality and ethics. The law is a definition, something substantial, a contract that everyone must abide by. When we have to make a subjective value judgment about something that exists in substance, there is never a correct version of this judgment, because correctness is also a subjective judgment. So the law itself is not just, but the point of the law is to ensure procedural justice, which can also be understood as a contractual relationship shared by society as a whole – that is, by those you know and those you don’t.
  3. I think the unjust law is the Patriot Act, which violates the protection of civil liberties in the U.S. Constitution. And the just law is the First Amendment, which protects the freedom of speech of citizens.

13

  1. According to MLK, how can we tell the difference between just and unjust laws? Understanding this question is the most important part of this module, and I will ask it again during our second exam.

According to MLK, “A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law.” So, we can tell the difference between just and unjust laws, an unjust law that doesn’t apply to everyone equally. For instance, segregation is unjust because it harms people, I take away their rights. A just law respects human rights, follows the regulations, and sticks to the necessary restrictions.

  • In your view, is this an important distinction (between just and unjust laws), do you think it makes a difference in the way someone (as an individual, or our society as a whole) lives their lives? Can it affect our politics?

Yes, it is an essential distinction between just and unjust laws. When there are just laws, everyone gets the same treatment, and people receive the same advantage. Laws ensure our general safety and protect our rights as citizens against abuse by others.

  • Based on our discussion of Question 1, give an example each, of an unjust and just law, in the US today. Explain what makes it unjust or just (using MLK’s definition of those two types of laws).

I think an unjust law is The Patriot Act is an unjust law since every rule infringes on people’s privacy and human rights, and there are unjust conditions that give law enforcement personnel excessive power. And a just law can be the First Amendment.

Ignacio Salas on MLK and his defense from jail

1. The difference between them is that a just law, is a rule made by the man, following the morality taught by religion, in this case Christianism, it is an implicit law of God, a just law is created to help society and each one of its subjects equally, not creating any disparities, on the other hand, an unjust law is not based in eternal or natural law, it gives false senses of superiority or inferiority to citizens depending if the law is unjust or not for them.

2. When just laws are implemented, everybody gets the same benefits, it creates a healthy society, and pushes for a prosper future, however, unjust laws, give society the chance to see in an introspective manner the opportunity to criticize the system they live in, and how they can transform institutions to give all the citizens the same respect and rights. It is important to know the difference between just and unjust laws, because as society is in constant evolution, just laws, can become unjust in the future due to the changes in the way of how society thinks.

3. Food sharing was criminalized for some time, it started in California and later spread throughout the country, where people were apprehended by the police when trying to help homeless people by giving them food, this was the case of Arnold Abbot, a 90-year-old nonprofit leader who was arrested several times due to the violation of the local “Food Sharing” ordinance in Fort Lauderdale. Making the lives of homeless people more miserable because they could not even get a meal from Samaritans.

The Civil Rights Act implementation in 1964, this law had an unquestionable impact, it helped to end public racial discrimination in public accommodations in public and employment (desegregation), making the game a little fairer for that time in American history and uplifting human personality as MLK saw that just laws did.

Just and Unjust Law distinction for MLK


According to MLK, how can we tell the difference between just and unjust laws?  Understanding this questions is the most important part of this module, and I will ask it again during our second exam.

For MLK the difference between just and unjust laws is clear. In his words : “Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust. All segregation statutes are unjust because segregation distorts the soul and damages the personality”. In short, an unjust law is that which denigrates people. Moreover, it is a law that serves to create inequalities between people. On the other hand, a just law is that which is created to protect and encourage the well being of all people no matter their gender, age, preferences or color.   

In your view, is this an important distinction (between just and unjust laws), do you think it makes a difference in the way someone (as an individual, or our society as a whole) lives their lives? Can it affect our politics?

Of course I agree. The distinction of just and unjust laws is essential to have a healthy society. Indeed, recognizing the difference between both allows people to realize that sometimes what is legal is not necessarily to the best interest of all. Furthermore, it is important because it makes people ask themselves questions about the Legal and Justice Systems. In a nutshell, learning about this distinction generates criticism of the system people have inherited. Later, allowing them to acknowledge its flaws and transform their government into something better. This is how it affects politics. An educated population has the ability to analyze their institutions, claim changes and pressure those in power to change what is not working for all.

Based on our discussion of Question 1, give an example each, of an unjust and just law, in the US today. Explain what makes it unjust or just (using MLK’s definition of those two types of laws).

According to Global Citizen, rapists can have parental rights in seven states : Most states have laws that prevent rapists from claiming parental rights, but seven states do not: Alabama, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Dakota, New Mexico, and Wyoming. In some cases, this has resulting in sexual assault victims having to coparent with their perpetrator, meaning the rapist has visitation rights and stays in contact with the child and mother. It is not necessary to say why this is an unjust law. It is completely insane that the law allows a man, who has raped a woman, to share parenting rights over the consequences of his felony. . . How can even a sexual perpetrator have the right to be alone with a child that is the product of his damage? It causes indignation.

On the other hand, a just law is the Freedom of Information Act. This law gives everyone the right to see and use records from any government establishment. According to hibernian digest : “The law lets citizens know happenings in government. Federal agencies must disclose any information requested under this act with exemptions to personal privacy, law enforcement, and classified information ”. In my opinion, this is a just law because it is a tool for citizens to regulate the government’s transparency. In fact, it is a law that allows Americans to get the necessary information to analyze their government’s actions. Then, decide if what is being done is equal to the best interest of all. Thus, this law protects and promotes a fair society.

Sources:

https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/sexist-laws-in-the-us-in-2017/?template=next

https://hiberniandigest.com/2020/06/02/8-important-laws-you-need-to-know-as-an-american-citizen

Just and Unjust Laws

  1. According to MLK, how can we tell the difference between just and unjust laws? Understanding these questions is the most important part of this module, and I will ask it again during our second exam.

According to MLK, just laws are laws that respect the humanity of people and which follow moral and ethical codes. Unjust laws, therefore, are laws that do not consider morality and ethical reasoning, and which disregard the humanity of those the law is ruling over.

  1. In your view, is this an important distinction (between just and unjust laws), do you think it makes a difference in the way someone (as an individual, or our society as a whole) lives their lives? Can it affect our politics?

This is an important distinction. I agree with MLK’s assessment that we have an obligation to disobey unjust laws as a way to challenge them. I also think the distinction is important; there are laws and agreements that are helpful to the functioning of society and which are just, but those that are not should be challenged directly. It will make a difference to those victims of such unjust laws when we collectively disobey them, putting pressure on the government or ruling bodies to change the laws to truly be just or to get rid of them altogether.

  1. Based on our discussion of Question 1, give an example of an unjust and just law, in the US today. Explain what makes it unjust or just (using MLK’s definition of those two types of laws).

Unjust — Jaywalking is illegal

Jaywalking is a minor law, but is still sometimes enforced. I regularly break this law and have never been confronted for doing so, but I can see how the racism inherent to policing makes this largely unenforced law dangerous if police do decide to enforce it based on racism. I, a small, white woman, am not likely to be stopped for what is a routine, mundane part of my day, but jaywalking for a BIPOC might lead to unjust interactions with police. My humanity is not ever part of the equation, but this law could be used to infringe on the humanity of Black and Brown people for committing the same infraction.

Just — murder is illegal

This preserves the humanity of individuals by dissuading people from killing. This makes sense, because it protects the humanity of all who may be victims, not just some. However, as we’ve seen, even just laws can be manipulated or selectively enforced in unjust ways to allow individuals with money and power to avoid justice in a system that supposedly has the interests of the people at heart.

DB 13/Just/Un-Just Laws

  1. According to MLK, the difference between just and unjust laws are based on one main thing — moral vs. immoral. He explains that while it is man-made, a just law is rooted in morality and/or “law of God.” It should uplift and protect people. Unjust laws are simply laws not in alignment with natural and eternal law. Furthermore unjust laws violate human rights. MLK further references the then segregation laws, relating that to a law unjust in nature due it’s distortion of the soul.
  2. In my opinion, this distinction is fundamentally important. Looking at a societies set of laws and determining how unjust the laws are will show how poorly a certain group of citizens are treated vs another group benefitting from that mistreatment. This affects the daily lives of all parties involved. It can affect their lives because one can benefit from it and will continue to uphold those unjust laws because they don’t apply to them. On the other hand, the non-benefitting will have to fight back to eventually change those laws.
  3. One example of an unjust just is, relating to Module 9, “Sneak and Peak warrants” under the Patriot Act giving law enforcement rights to invading organizations and private individuals right to privacy. Not only do these violate amendment rights, it violates their natural right to have privacy. An example of a just law is outlaw of driving while intoxicated. This protects both parties by deterring driving under the influence. An intoxicated individual who may not be aware of their surrounds and risks possibly killing and innocent people in another car or standing by. In the case an incident does happen the guilty should be charged and ultimately penalized. 

Jasmin Amigon- Discussion post

  1. According to MLK, how can we tell the difference between just and unjust laws? Understanding this questions is the most important part of this module, and I will ask it again during our second exam.

According to MLK, an unjust law is one that is out of step with the rest of society’s moral rules or practices. An unjust law is one that the majority imposes on the minority despite the fact that the majority is not required to respect it. In other terms, it is an unjust law that does not apply equally to everyone. A just law is one that respects human rights, adheres to the appropriate restrictions, and follows the rules.

  1. In your view, is this an important distinction (between just and unjust laws), do you think it makes a difference in the way someone (as an individual, or our society as a whole) lives their lives? Can it affect our politics?

Just and unjust laws, in my opinion, make a difference because they influence how people live their lives in professional settings, at home, legally, and so on. This is a significant distinction between right and wrong because it has political implications; it is the reason why it is illegal to enable young persons under the age of 18 to work for more than 8 hours every day, both men and women have the right to vote, and all individuals have the opportunity to go to school and receive an education.

3. Based on our discussion of Question 1, give an example each, of an unjust and just law, in the US today. Explain what makes it unjust or just (using MLK’s definition of those two types of laws).

One example of an unjust law is private probation abuses, As the legal system becomes more privatized, private probation corporations have emerged as one of the most egregious violators of constitutional rights. Counties are throwing off public probation officials designed to facilitate private firms to profit off of the public.

An example of a just law is in the 2nd amendment the right to bear arms. Therefore there are certain states where individuals are not allowed to own guns which are, California, Florida, Illinois, Texas, South Carolina, and New York. 

Nikita Vasilyev – D.B. 13.1

  1. Martin Luther King makes a clear distinction between laws and morals: he argues that it is immoral to obey an unjust law, a law that is out of harmony with the moral law. An unjust law is the one that degrades human personality, whereas a just law is the law that uplifts the personality. King gives an example of an unjust law by using segregation laws that give both, the segregator and the segregated, false feelings of superiority and inferiority respectively. The segregated are diminished to the level of things, not people, which is not only economically and sociologically unsound, but also morally wrong.
  2. The difference between just and unjust laws is crucial – just laws make societies inclusive and beneficial to individuals, unjust laws distort reality and damage personality. Without the knowledge of morals and just laws that are based on morals, an individual would easily be swayed in wrong directions, since their lives are not guided by universal principles and are out of harmony with the moral law. Culture, shaped by just laws, is the mirror of politics – Civil Rights groups and lawmakers are affecting the culture of a country as well as politics. Laws, culture, and politics are closely intertwined and, when combined, give us a worldview, a lens through which we see the society, the individual, the interactions between the two and the moral content.
  3. I believe that New York State Clean Indoor Air Act could be seen as a just law – it prohibited smoking and vaping in most public areas thereby protecting the health and well-being of non-smokers and giving smokers an opportunity to see their habit as harmful. On the other side of moral life is the recently passed voting law in the state of Georgia – the law was passed by Republicans in response to Democratic Party victories in presidential and Senate elections. By imposing strict and, sometimes, absurd restrictions and regulations on the voting process, the Republicans are aiming at getting their power and influence back while ignoring that their actions are morally wrong and instill a feeling of inferiority in those, who dared to vote Democratic in a Republican state. 

Discussion Board 13 SaiLungCash Jeung

1.According to Martin Luther King, we can use human nature and morality to distinguish between just and unjust laws. A just law protects the rights of the people, and morality is the first. On the contrary, an unjust law deprives human rights . It is not rooted in the laws of nature.

2.I think just laws will have an impact on individuals or society as a whole, because just laws respect human nature and morality. It allows people to improve their personal virtues and morals and has a positive impact on individuals or society as a whole. But unjust laws damage the existence of humanity and morality, and it will bring unfairness to society.

3.I think the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is a just law, because the First Amendment protects the people’s freedom of speech, which is the people’s most basic personal right. Basically, the amendments to the U.S. Constitution are just laws. And the The Patriot Act is an unjust law, because every regulation violates the privacy and human rights of the people, and there are unfair factors that cause law enforcement officers to have great powers.