Thomas Harbison’s Profile

Staff
Active 1 day, 14 hours ago
Thomas Harbison
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he/him/his
Office Location
S-510A
Office or Center
E-Learning

Courses

CRJ  204|Criminal Justice and the Urban Community|Margaryan

CRJ 204|Criminal Justice and the Urban Community|Margaryan

This course takes a critical approach to the study of crime and justice in urban settings. Course materials examine contemporary crime-related issues that affect urban communities within a historical and sociological context. The course highlights the intersections of deviant behavior and the criminal justice system within the structures of class, race, gender, and power inequalities. Topics explored may include racial profiling, juvenile delinquency, media representations of crime, policing, the war on drugs, and prisoner re-entry.

ACL 150 | Literacy in American Society | Course Hub

ACL 150 | Literacy in American Society | Course Hub

What is your definition of literacy? Literacy in American Society asks students to investigate the varieties of literacy behaviors in American society as sociocultural phenomena. Students will be exposed to the research of major scholars in the interdisciplinary field of literacy research (e.g., New Literacy Studies) as a means of considering the role literacy and literacy behavior plays, both historically and in a contemporary context, in a diverse American society. Students will analyze the various definitions of literacy and track the development of multiple literacies in American society, specifically studying the transmission of literacy as a cultural value, particularly in oppressed communities. The course will provide the students with the opportunity to analyze and reflect on their personal relationship with literacy and opportunities for upward mobility in a stratified United States. Prior to 2023, this course was designated as ACR 150.

PHI 100 073 / Human Personality / Fall 2022 / Maksim Vak

PHI 100 073 / Human Personality / Fall 2022 / Maksim Vak

In our course we will address one of the most disturbing questions for human beings – what does it mean to be human; what makes one human? Since the beginning of philosophy humans have been understood in conjunction with animals and gods; humans mediated between nature and the divine realm. Thus, human nature was understood by the fathers of philosophy as mediation, which actualizes itself as thinking and recognition. That is, to be human is to know oneself. Aristotle famously formulated the essence of human beings as rational animals. One becomes human by understanding and controlling one’s animality. Aristotle’s definition dominated western philosophy until the XIX centuries. In our course, we will follow the transformation of Aristotelian understanding in modern time and the challenges it has faced in its transformation. Our inquiry will be organized by the dialectical opposition and evaluation of freedom and determination, obedience and disobedience, mortality and immortality, body and soul, ignorance and knowledge, happiness and misery, humanity and inhumanity, desires and their suppression, etc. We will examine the possible significance and meanings of human existence, the socialization of humanity, and its values. We will follow the development of the view on the human position in the world from humble dependence on Divine grace to the proud position of autonomous legislator and to the consequent disaster and despair of this autonomy. Throughout the course, students will cultivate their critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, and they will establish a basis for discerning the ethical significance of these foundational questions concerning knowledge, existence, and human nature.

Language Race and Ethnicity in the U.S and its Territories

Language Race and Ethnicity in the U.S and its Territories

This course explores historical, cultural, and theoretical perspectives on the relationship between language, race, and ethnicity in the United States and its territories. It examines how language is understood to reflect, reproduce, and/or challenge and defy racial and ethnic boundaries, and how ideas about race and ethnicity influence the ways in which people use and construe language. It covers topics such as racialization and racism, ethnicization, notions of authenticity, repertoire, codeswitching and style shifting, linguistic mocking and linguistic racism, language ideology, and identity formation. This course will examine language varieties such as Black American English and its cross-racial uses by other groups, Chicano English and Spanglish, Asian American English, Hawaiian English, and American Indian English.

MES140 – INTRODUCTION TO THE MOVING IMAGE

MES140 – INTRODUCTION TO THE MOVING IMAGE

Introduction to the Moving Image is primarily a film history class.

Communities

Black Studies Across the Americas (BSAA)

Black Studies Across the Americas (BSAA)

This project is supported with U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center funding from the Center for Latin American Studies at The Ohio State University and the NYU Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies as well as the the BMCC Dept. of Ethnic and Race Studies and the President’s Fund for Innovation and Excellence, funded by McKenzie Scott. BSAA faculty and student researchers create OERs to help integrate Black studies into disciplines that historically don’t address Blackness and questions of race and ethnicity. BSAA OERs are hosted here on the BMCC OpenLab to foster further collaboration and use of the OERs at BMCC and beyond.

OpenLab for Students

OpenLab for Students

OpenLab for Students in a space for students to access information about OpenLab workshops, how to use OpenLab tools and much more!

Gina’s Playground

Gina’s Playground

Test community

BMCC Teaching Exchange

BMCC Teaching Exchange

A space for BMCC faculty to share ideas about teaching and learning. You can also join us at our live discussions in-person or on Zoom. Group image: “Networks Personal Users” by geralt used under a Pixabay license.

Teaching on the OpenLab | Summer 2022

Teaching on the OpenLab | Summer 2022

A virtual learning community for faculty who applied and were accepted to participate in the June 2022 Teaching on the OpenLab. (image credit: “OPEN” by Tom Magliery is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Projects

BMCC Academic Leaves

BMCC Academic Leaves

A space for faculty to share information about the projects they worked on while on academic leave. Contact Greer McPhaden for information about how to submit your project. If you join this group, you will receive email notifications when new projects are submitted.

MMA 100 Class Videos

MMA 100 Class Videos

MMA 100 class videos.

Teach On!

Teach On!

A space for faculty to share ideas about how to support student learning during the transition to distance learning for the remainder of Spring 2020. Please request to join if you are faculty at BMCC. Click on “Visit Project Site” in the upper right to access BMCC’s Course Continuity Resources website.

Opening Gateway Project Summer 2020

Opening Gateway Project Summer 2020

In this project I will apply Active Learning strategies I have learned at the Opening Gateways seminars such as Webwork, EdPuzzle, Plickers, Inquiry Base Learning, Flipped Classroom, Universal Design for Learning, and HelpYourMath software and Videos to be used in the students mathematics projects such as the Stock Market Game and ePortfolio in addition to Lesson Planning in the MAT56 course that will be available on the BMCC OpenLab website. Please view the Mathematics Department Syllabus for the MAT56 course of the Integrated Algebra and Trigonometry that I will be teaching in the Spring 2020 semester by clicking the link here at: https://www.bmcc.cuny.edu/wp-content/uploads/ported/syllabi/MAT56.pdf

Opening Gateways Project

Opening Gateways Project

In this project I will apply Active Learning strategies I have learned at the Opening Gateways seminars.