Karen Thornhill’s Profile

Faculty
Active 1 year, 10 months ago
Karen Thornhill
Pronouns
She/her/hers
Office Location
N-720
About Me
I have a degree in Comparative Literature, and a graduate degree in English Literature with an emphasis on literary theory, particularly the collected works of Walter Benjamin. I have taught writing and literature courses abroad and in Hawaii as well as in New York City. My interests include sports, traveling, languages, music, science and technology.
Department
English
Academic Program
Writing and Literature, A.A.

Courses

Language Race and Ethnicity in the U.S and its Territories

Language Race and Ethnicity in the U.S and its Territories

This course explores historical, cultural, and theoretical perspectives on the relationship between language, race, and ethnicity in the United States and its territories. It examines how language is understood to reflect, reproduce, and/or challenge and defy racial and ethnic boundaries, and how ideas about race and ethnicity influence the ways in which people use and construe language. It covers topics such as racialization and racism, ethnicization, notions of authenticity, repertoire, codeswitching and style shifting, linguistic mocking and linguistic racism, language ideology, and identity formation. This course will examine language varieties such as Black American English and its cross-racial uses by other groups, Chicano English and Spanglish, Asian American English, Hawaiian English, and American Indian English.

English 201-1008

English 201-1008

English 201-1008: Introduction to Literature

English 201: Introduction to Literature

English 201: Introduction to Literature

English 201 a writing course that builds upon the skills introduced in English 101. In this course, literature is the field for the development of critical reading, critical thinking, independent research, and the further refinement of writing skills. Like English 101, English 201 is a required course for all students at BMCC. Students are introduced to literary criticism and acquire basic knowledge necessary for the analysis of a variety of texts. By the conclusion of English 201, students will be prepared for the analytical and research-based writing required in upper-level courses across the curriculum; they will also be prepared for advanced courses in literature.

Communities

Teaching on the OpenLab | Summer 2022

Teaching on the OpenLab | Summer 2022

A virtual learning community for faculty who applied and were accepted to participate in the June 2022 Teaching on the OpenLab. (image credit: “OPEN” by Tom Magliery is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Projects

None found.