Course: Critical Thinking CRT 100 – 054W/ Fall 2023/ Prof. Barnes/ Online/ Writing Intensive

active 2 months ago
Critical Thinking CRT 100 - 054W/ Fall 2023/ Prof. Barnes/ Online/ Writing Intensive
This Course is OPEN.
Department
Academic Literacy and Linguistics
Academic Program
Linguistics and Literacy, A.A.
Course Contact
Course Code
CRT 100
Section Code
054W
Term
Fall 2023
Course Description

Critical Thinking (Same as CRT 100) is designed to develop the mind and help students learn to think clearly and effectively. Through substantive readings, structured writing assignments and ongoing discussions, students will examine concrete examples from their own experience and readings and contemporary issues in the media to learn how to analyze issues, solve problems, and make informed decisions in their academic, professional, and personal lives.

Recent Posts

Thank you!

Dear Students, I have read your final reflections and submitted final grades. Thank you for […] See MoreThank you!

Final reflection due by tonight!

Please submit it on Blackboard if you haven’t already. I look forward to reading them! Prof. Barnes See MoreFinal reflection due by tonight!

Justin Centeno Conv 8

I chose the movie parasite. One of the moral dilemmas that stuck out to me is the way the Kim […] See MoreJustin Centeno Conv 8

Recent Comments

Comment on: Convo 5

The assertion that "money doesn't always guarantee happiness because it's not the only factor that […] See MoreComment on: Convo 5

Comment on: Brianna Barnes Conv 3

I agree with you They had about the same coverage of the story as the other two articles except […] See MoreComment on: Brianna Barnes Conv 3

Comment on: The I decided to choose is tu quoque fallacy, also known as the “you too” fallacy, occurs when someone dismisses an argument by pointing out that the person making the argument is also guilty of the same thing. For example, if someone says smoking is bad for your health and the other person responds with, “Well, you eat unhealthy food, so you’re no better.” This fallacy is flawed because it doesn’t address the original argument.The I decided to choose is tu quoque fallacy, also known as the “you too” fallacy, occurs when someone dismisses an argument by pointing out that the person making the argument is also guilty of the same thing. For example, if someone says smoking is bad for your health and the other person responds with, “Well, you eat unhealthy food, so you’re no better.” This fallacy is flawed because it doesn’t address the original argument.

Yes I agree with you This fallacy is flawed because it doesn’t address the original argument.The I […] See MoreComment on: The I decided to choose is tu quoque fallacy, also known as the “you too” fallacy, occurs when someone dismisses an argument by pointing out that the person making the argument is also guilty of the same thing. For example, if someone says smoking is bad for your health and the other person responds with, “Well, you eat unhealthy food, so you’re no better.” This fallacy is flawed because it doesn’t address the original argument.The I decided to choose is tu quoque fallacy, also known as the “you too” fallacy, occurs when someone dismisses an argument by pointing out that the person making the argument is also guilty of the same thing. For example, if someone says smoking is bad for your health and the other person responds with, “Well, you eat unhealthy food, so you’re no better.” This fallacy is flawed because it doesn’t address the original argument.

Recent Discussions

Sorry, there were no discussion topics found.

Recent Docs

No Recent Docs