Course: BUS 311-1801 | HR Management | Professor Buckler | Spring 2021

Compensation

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    • #6276

      Brielle Buckler
      Participant

      For this discussion, refer to this prompt from Lumen Learning (copied below):

      Pay equity issues run rampant in the United States. Women, on average, only earn a portion of what a man does, and a minority woman could earn even less yet. Organizations need only look in their own backyards to see the pay gap rearing its ugly head—almost every organization has one.

      You’re an HR professional at an organization that thinks it’s paying its women fairly. Still, you want to make sure. Bias and pay discrepancies come in all shapes and sizes, and symptoms of the pay gap could be lurking in the shadows. So, you start doing some research.

      Where do you look? What are your plans? Online searches can provide you with a variety of places to look and steps to take to uncover pay gaps at your organization. List two or three different steps that you, as an HR professional, would take to ensure that the company is doing everything it can to ensure pay equity. Provide a quick explanation of each of those plans, if necessary, and share your sources. Once you’ve put together your list and explanation, review the lists of at least two other classmates, and provide them with suggestions.

      ———————————————————————-

      In order to receive full credit for this assignment, all components of this assignment are due by 11:59pm ET on Sunday, April 4, 2021. You should first contribute a thoughtful post of your own before viewing/commenting on the posts of others. Once you submit your post, you must respond meaningfully to at least two other classmates’ threads. This assignment is worth a total of ten (10) points — 6 possible points for your original post, and up to 2 points for each of the two responses to your classmates’ posts. Please reference our Discussion Rubric for more information.

    • #7501

      Jennifer Baker
      Participant

      I found this to be an interesting question because as I looked into it, my first thought (checking relevant salaries through tools like salary.com etc.) I found to be not at all what was discussed in various articles I found on conducting a pay equity audit. Instead, all the information to look at it internal (which makes sense – setting compensation to be favorable generally would include looking at peer companies, region, etc. but in this case we are looking at whether pay is fair between people already employed at our company).

      **********

      Step one is a two-piece item I think: a) identifying exactly what question you are asking and trying to solve (there is a big difference between trying to achieve actual equity and asking “are our actions illegal”, which is a much lower bar to clear) and b) getting buy-in from the top-level management. Suppose that you find there is indeed a wage gap, that will take significant money to close? Is the company going to step up and close that gap and take a hit in the budget? You definitely want to be sure the CEO and everyone on down is on the same page in this regard.

      The second step I would take is one recommended by the first article I link below, which I think can be very helpful as you look to repair this situation now and – importantly – going forward: research how historical and current compensation has been determined. Do managers have a strong (and outsize) influence on pay decisions (which could mean they push harder for make employees, consciously or not)? Are the women routinely dinged for a perception that they aren’t “team players” (but it turns out that means willingness to attend after-hours events all the time, effectively penalizing people who are primary family caretakers, usually women?) These types of things that impact pay decisions are all things that will need to be addressed and rememdied if pay equity will be achieved and established as a norm going forward. (Note: a few companies, including Reddit, have taken the still unusual step of outright eliminating any negotiation as a way to remove that lever for bias/disparate impact – which looks to have a pretty good track record but it not the easiest change to talk people into when we are so conditioned to the idea that negotiation is vital [and which it is for all companies where this is *not* the rule]. Some more info on that is here: https://www.npr.org/2015/04/23/401468571/some-companies-fight-pay-gap-by-eliminating-salary-negotiations, https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/news/hr-magazine/Pages/0915-salary-negotiation-bans.aspx, and https://www.forbes.com/sites/financialfinesse/2018/04/11/a-powerful-way-to-close-the-pay-gap-dont-negotiate-salaries/?sh=1543908d2209)

      The third step is to actually collect the data and analyze it – including things like performance rating information, job location, overtime pay, as well as gender and job roles. This is an intensive process and to be honest, reading about it….I would hire an outside firm with significant experience in this if at all possible. Unless your organization is very small, there often develop weird multiple titles that are similar for various positions, while alternately the same job title can have a huge range of responsibilities (and pay), with some employees doing much less in the same title than others. Sorting all that out and sussing out gender and other demographic axes can be very complicated and absolutely should be done by someone who knows what they are doing.

      ************

      Some articles I found helpful on this include https://hrexecutive.com/follow-these-7-steps-to-an-effective-pay-equity-audit/ and https://www.visier.com/clarity/head-of-diversity-and-inclusion-how-to-pay-equity-analysis/. The second article is particularly helpful in breaking down an example of the actual analysis.

      • #7503

        Shane russell
        Participant

        Hi Jennifer,

        I agree with the wage gap between women and men, in this world and u believe, if your doing the same job you should get paid the same amount. Some men can’t even do they job and get paid more ,when a women that has more experience and provides better numbers for the company’s gets paid less. It’s not fair to women who do the better work while men who do nothing get the more compensate.

      • #7507

        Sonia Gonzalez
        Participant

        Hi Jennifer,

        I also agree with the wage gap between women and men. This is true earlier women used to earn lesser than men because girls were restricted by their families on certain types of jobs or due to lesser education qualification or due to family pressure or due to child upbringing.  As a result women used to have lesser experience than men and were paid less. If they are both doing the same job then the salary should be the same.

        Thank you for sharing.

      • #7607

        Teri
        Participant

        Step three is very true and once addressed will help out tremendously in all companies.

    • #7504

      Shane russell
      Participant

      Update hiring practices

      make your job descriptions gender neutral

      Remove gender-biased terms from your job description, including gender-specific references and pronouns. Instead, focus on the work-related requirements and experience. Not only will fewer candidates submit resumes, but females without “foreman” experience may be offered lower pay due to a perception of missing experience, even if you hire them for the job. Female applicants may well have supervisory and management experience, even in manufacturing or construction. Isn’t that what you’re really after?

      Remove discrimination from your screening questions

      Education and industry experience are two examples. For example, if you have a job and screen for individuals who have degrees in economics or engineering, you’re going to get fewer diverse applicants and screen out top talent that can do the job. Further, if you focus on the skills needed, rather than the industry, you’ll find there are plenty of strong candidates with technical skills, leadership skills, data analytic skills, and problem-solving skills that come from more diverse backgrounds. As long as they can do the job, why should they be paid less?

      Eliminate prior salary questions from your interviews

      Why? Because prior salary has no bearing on whether a candidate can do the job or not. In fact, that question furthers gender discrimination in pay by facilitating wage suppression as employees move from job to job. The next time you post a job, determine the salary in advance. Then, regardless of whether the candidate you hire identifies as male, female, or is from a diverse background, offer them fair pay for doing that job. Factors like race and gender have no bearing on their work.

      Evaluate your culture

      Involve women in hiring decisions

      If all your hiring managers and supervisors are males, you’ll have bias that will perpetuate discrimination in hiring and contribute to pay inequity. A way to overcome that is to bring females (even if they don’t have the job title) into the interviewing process for balance. Here’s data from Harvard on why: “When a woman was making the decision, women were hired 50 percent of the time, yet when a male employer was making the call, women had only a 40 percent chance of getting hired.”

      Find executive sponsor to support equal pay

      Executives with a legal or finance background make good sponsors. Attorneys understand the legal ramifications of pay discrimination. Finance folks tend to understand the risk that a lack of diversity can cause as well as the financial benefits an organization reaps when it has a workforce aligned with its client or consumer base.

      Fitsmallbusiness.com- resources

       

      • #7633

        Zoila Cedeno
        Participant

        Hi Shane.

        I like your idea about involving women in hiring decisions and making sure that you have a mixed hiring team so that you can reduce the possibility of bias and pay inequity.  As far as eliminating salary questions from the interview process, effective January 6, 2020, in New York employers are legally forbidden to ask a prospective employee regarding salary history.   An employer can only ask what your salary expectations are, nothing else.  A small step that we hope will help in this battle.

    • #7505

      Shane russell
      Participant

      <p class=”p2″></p>
      Update hiring practices
      -Make your job descriptions gender neutral

      Remove gender-biased terms from your job description, including gender-specific references and pronouns. Instead, focus on the work-related requirements and experience. Not only will fewer candidates submit resumes, but females without “foreman” experience may be offered lower pay due to a perception of missing experience, even if you hire them for the job. Female applicants may well have supervisory and management experience, even in manufacturing or construction. Isn’t that what you’re really after?

      -Remove discrimination from your screening questions

      Education and industry experience are two examples. For example, if you have a job and screen for individuals who have degrees in economics or engineering, you’re going to get fewer diverse applicants and screen out top talent that can do the job. Further, if you focus on the skills needed, rather than the industry, you’ll find there are plenty of strong candidates with technical skills, leadership skills, data analytic skills, and problem-solving skills that come from more diverse backgrounds. As long as they can do the job, why should they be paid less?

      -Eliminate prior salary questions from your interviews

      Why? Because prior salary has no bearing on whether a candidate can do the job or not. In fact, that question furthers gender discrimination in pay by facilitating wage suppression as employees move from job to job. The next time you post a job, determine the salary in advance. Then, regardless of whether the candidate you hire identifies as male, female, or is from a diverse background, offer them fair pay for doing that job. Factors like race and gender have no bearing on their work.

      Evaluate your culture
      -Involve women in hiring decisions

      If all your hiring managers and supervisors are males, you’ll have bias that will perpetuate discrimination in hiring and contribute to pay inequity. A way to overcome that is to bring females (even if they don’t have the job title) into the interviewing process for balance. Here’s data from Harvard on why: “When a woman was making the decision, women were hired 50 percent of the time, yet when a male employer was making the call, women had only a 40 percent chance of getting hired.”

      -Find executive sponsor to support equal pay

      Executives with a legal or finance background make good sponsors. Attorneys understand the legal ramifications of pay discrimination. Finance folks tend to understand the risk that a lack of diversity can cause as well as the financial benefits an organization reaps when it has a workforce aligned with its client or consumer base.

      Fitsmallbusiness.com

      • #7548

        Robert Calaf
        Participant

        Hi Shane,

        I have some agreements and disagreements with your argument on this topic. All in good fun though.

        I do agree with your thinking on removing gender based terms, or discriminatory language in terms of the job title and description of the job. Same with eliminating prior salary questions from an employee interview. The gender based terms/discriminatory language have no place on a job description/serve no purpose in describing the job and may cause the person applying to believe the company is already leaning towards hiring a specific gender over another. Prior salary questions in a job interview only serve to put the person applying for the job in a salary box. The employer may have already had a salary range set for the position but if person X tells them in the interview they did their last job for much lower; then the person interviewing may see an opening to simply hire them for their previous salary plus X amount because the bar has already been set low. This is an unfair and manipulative practice.

        The only part I disagree on is the point you made about Education and industry experience are two examples of discrimination in screening questions. Sure, these questions may act as a filter to people without direct experience or education pertaining to that job, but there are many jobs that require that to be successful or for someone to be fully up and running without costing the company additional time and money to train someone who has not operated in that space before. I would rather this continue to be the practice, people can still apply without the education/industry exp and the company decide if they take the risk. Education and industry experience is really what makes a resume, a resume and sets us apart from the crowd. Why shouldn’t we continue to use that as a means to set ourselves apart from other applicants?

    • #7506

      Sonia Gonzalez
      Participant

      Sonia Gonzalez

      4/04/2021

      Pay equity issues are rampant across the world and even in big companies.  The first step would be online or human resources payroll information in the company. In the industry, the pay scale according to designation can be identified. In the company itself, this can be compared with two-person working at the same level but different gender, male and female. So, comparison in terms of the job description and no years’ experience would give a better idea for comparison. This can be done for many levels, like entry-level job payment for both males and females and middle and top management. It is generally seen that the pay gap is more comprehensive in middle and top management than the entry-level jobs.

      The second will be checking promotions. It can also be identified in the company and how frequently one is getting promoted and on good merit. Usually, the discrimination between men and women is evident here as well. As HR members, we need to check the payroll and compare males in the company, females in the company—there nothing wrong with anybody performing such tasks- if that’s part of their job description. But sometimes, the duties are permanently assigned to women rather than men for no reason. That’s when either an implicit or explicit gender bias is most likely at play.

      An external pay audit can also help recover the gaps. HR can better serve in comparison to come up with insights into this discrimination. After the problem or the gap is identified, the plan to resolve it can also be male and female brought out. The goal would be to have compelling evidence after research to present to management to overturn the current unbalanced income between females vs. males. The auditors need to perform a regression analysis to account for pay differentials bases on legitimate factors, such as experience, education, and training. Hence, the productivity, efficiency, attrition rate, etc., of men and women can be resolved.  This can be used to address women’s biases as they would take more breaks or not be that efficient as men can be tackled. This points out that women are more loyal to a company, are more hardworking and diligent, and work at the same level as men, with upper management facts. Studies show paying women less than their counterparts may be a direct indication of lower productivity and morale.

      In summation, compensation can be determined by job analysis and job evaluations. The recruitment should complete an analysis of planning and an audit required for fixing the pay, and we should do the pay gap analysis to know how much we should pay. There is a federal law that needs equal pay for work.

      http://www.payequity.gov.on

      Home


      http://www.shrm.org

      • #7508

        Sonia Gonzalez
        Participant
      • #7547

        Robert Calaf
        Participant

        Hi Sonia,

        Great post! I am a bit still on the fence on whether the Pay Equity Audit should be conducted in house or by an external company (not considering size of company in this thought). Reason being, depending on how long you have been with the company, it may be a bit tricky to come off as neutral or objective to your management staff or perhaps company leadership if pay inequity was taking place under your watch or perhaps out of the desire to save the company money; employees were hired in a manner that may look like pay inequity when it comes to gender when the data is analyzed. One way to get that objective/neutral third party view would be to enlist the help of an external company to conduct the audit and you simply present their recommendations to company leadership and lobby for their buy in to address this issue and speak to the benefits.

        We all know this is absolutely the right thing to do but in any action that one takes in a company that is going to cost the company money or perhaps unearth some skeletons in the closet. It is best to think strategically how you can sell the initiative and not end up being the solo advocate working against a mountain of resistance.

    • #7546

      Robert Calaf
      Participant

      If I were an HR professional tasked with ensuring gender pay equity is taking place at my organization. I would take a look at two key areas. The organizations payroll and hiring/promotion practices. Based on my expert google research, the following tools/plans were recommended by the Harvard Business Review and leanin.org

      “Pay Equity Audit – involves comparing the pay of employees doing “like for like” work in an organization (accounting for reasonable differentials, such as work experience, credentials, and job performance), and investigating the causes of any pay differences that cannot be justified. HR professionals typically lead the audit at small organizations (50+ employees), while larger employers (500+ employees) hire consulting firms that specialize in pay and rewards.” (Source: https://hbr.org/2020/11/how-to-identify-and-fix-pay-inequality-at-your-company)

      “Ensure that hiring and promotions are fair -Audit reviews and promotions regularly to ensure your company is not systematically rating men more highly and promoting them more quickly. Train managers so they understand the impact of gender bias on their decision-making and put clear and consistent criteria in place to reduce bias in staffing decisions and performance reviews.” (Source: https://leanin.org/what-companies-can-do-about-equal-pay#!)

      I would conduct both tasks as described and while I would not disclose individual pay adjustments (made to reach pay equity), I would announce internally without confidential information that progress is being made and show a measurable performance target of pay equity. This would give company employees a goal/cause to rally behind and celebrate. Continuous training of management and auditing to ensure hiring and promotion practices are fair would be on an ongoing basis. I would want to create the culture in the company that HR is keeping a very close eye on hiring and promotions and that any practice that is not in line with company pay equity policies will be subject to scrutiny or correction. No one should be introducing their own subjective bias into any personnel decision making. This is a key point I will communicate to all leaders across the company.

      • #7557

        Sonia Gonzalez
        Participant

        Hi Robert, This is a quintessential response, very well written, very well explained, very well thought out. All bases are covers. I measured myself to several standards. I overly critique myself, but this is how I will love to explain, and this is the way  I hope it comes across. BRAVO…

        Thank you for Sharing.

      • #7565

        Miko Nourieli
        Participant

        Hello Robert

        It seems we both used our expert google research and stumbled upon the same article from the Harvard Business Review. I also thought the first step should be a PEA like suggested in the article as that is a great base to start from when determining if there are pay inequalities and where exactly are they taking place. I also agree with your decision to not disclose employees pay and adjustments made as that can cause more feelings of unfairness if someone sees a decision they disagree with or think they should have gotten. Great post.

      • #7578

        Richard Ledesma
        Participant

        Hey Robert,

        I really like your response, like Sonia mentioned earlier it is very well writen and explained, I agree with you on your decision to not disclose employee pay as well. This is a very good explanation once again.

    • #7556

      Sow
      Participant

      The unfortunate reality is that despite the laws such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), the Equal Pay Act (EPA), and the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act (see Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009), employers still seem to have the upper hand when it comes to this issue. Too many employees aren’t aware of what their rights are or how to assert them. Many women aren’t even aware of how grossly underpaid they are. And too many women who are aware that they’re underpaid are afraid to speak up for fear of losing their jobs or experiencing other retaliation. The shaky job market in recent years certainly hasn’t helped this climate. The observation is that men earn on average more than women. Many believe that women on average $0.79 for every $1.00 men earn. This represents a 2.7 percentage point shrink in the unadjusted pay gap from three years ago, when women earned, on average, $0.76 for every $1.00 men earn.

      However, the gaps occurring in the labor force can be identified and narrowed by conducting PEAs (Pay Equity Audit). A pay equity analysis also called an equal pay audit, or a pay parity audit is a method of researching pay rates within your organization and assessing any differences in pay relative to age, race, gender, job description and responsibilities, seniority, and a wide range of other criteria.

      Before starting the audit, the auditors have to make sure that we are working with an accurate set of employee data. You should have each employee’s length of service, job classification, and demographic information, including gender, race, and age. Accessing this data may require a substantial clean-up effort, depending on the complexity and quality of HR record-keeping systems. For example, job titles, job grades, and aligning “like jobs with like jobs” (those that require equal skill, effort, and responsibility under similar conditions) is especially critical to pay equity analysis — and frequently out-of-date.

      Once you have a clean data set, the auditors perform a regression analysis to account for pay differentials based on legitimate factors, such as experience, education, and training. You’ll then be able to identify outliers based on gender, race, and age.

      All the elements cited above are a summary of the process of operating the PEA. More specifically, the PEA can follow these 5 steps:

      1. Plan early and plan well

      By identifying the purpose of the analysis, you will determine the methodology, timeline, personnel, required budget, and stakeholder buy-in necessary to conduct a thorough and accurate audit.

      1. Research your pay policies

      Before you even gather the compensation rates for all relevant positions, you need to understand how these rates were determined. Having an understanding of historical pay rates will not only safeguard the organization against legal action but will also help you understand the root causes of any pay inequity that currently exists.

      1. Gather the data and analyze them

      When gathering data, the information you’ll need will vary depending on the scope and purpose of your audit. Typically, you’ll want to include information on job title, job grade or level, department, date of hire, gender, and, depending on the scope of the audit, race, age, education level, beginning salary, and overtime pay and bonuses. Then, armed with the payment policies of your organization, you can start to gather other important information like performance ratings, punitive actions, and level of experience within the given field. Expect this step to be time and labor-intensive, as it will inform the bulk of your wage gap analysis. Analyzing the data will mean looking to determine whether there are differences in wages that can be tied to gender, race, age, or any other criteria. This analysis varies in complexity depending on group size, measurable criteria, and type of compensation.

      1. Assess whether pay differences are legally justified

      Your analysis may reveal that employees performing comparable work are not paid the same wage. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that unlawful activity is occurring. Federal law dictates that differences in pay are legal if they are based on seniority, merit, a system that measures earnings, quantity or quality of production, or any factor other than sex. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act elaborates on the vague language of that last clause by adding language for protections specifically “on the basis of race, color, sex, religion or national origin.”

      1. Take action to mitigate any pay differences

      If no applicable state or federal laws justify the wage gaps in the organization, then it’s time to address the disparities. The company will likely need to make adjustments to payment. However, as the auditor, you are not legally allowed to reduce employee compensation. This means you’ll need a financially viable way to raise, if necessary, the pay rate of one or several employees. Discuss your audit findings and get approval on a wage increase from finance or human resources. Then, take everything you’ve learned and store or publish your payment policies to inform any future hiring or wage decisions.

      In my opinion, these steps can emphasize the issues going on in the organization, but they are a little bit formal. In addition, the organization can go further by implementing an accurate or more efficient method for ensuring fair pay for women. First, training all the workers on the consequences of gender bias, whereas you are supervisor, manager, or a simple worker. Second, giving equal opportunity to all the sexes. Women should have the same adds of advancement as men. They (women) should get access to training and development programs, they also deserve mentorships and sponsorships for raising their performances. Lastly, everyone in the organization, regardless of sex, must know how the organization determines compensations. Thus, everyone will be aware of the bases which drive his pay.

       

      Work Cited:

      https://www.lucidchart.com/blog/pay-equity-analysis

      https://hbr.org/2020/11/how-to-identify-and-fix-pay-inequality-at-your-company

      https://www.glassdoor.com/employers/blog/5-ways-address-gender-pay-gap-company/

       

       

      • #7566

        Miko Nourieli
        Participant

        Hello Sow

        It seems that you also found the same article from Harvard Business Review that me and Robert used, I am glad to see that it wasn’t just me that found it useful. I really enjoyed your post because you explained each step clearly and easily. I agree with you that there can and will be pay differences for people doing comparable work based on multiple factors other than sex which should be taken into consideration and if there are any differences that do not arise from those that are legally justified, they should be corrected. Thank you very much for sharing your post.

    • #7563

      Talisha Smith
      Participant

      As a human resource director I always enforce equality and respect for all employers. In order to run a successful organization the people who contribute to the business must feel safe, appreciated and valued. It has been brought to my attention that woman receive less then men do even though they do the same work and sometimes have the same education. It affects Black and Latina woman especially. As reported by Harvard business review black and latino woman loose up to $1 million or more over a 40 year career. That is a huge problem and shows discrimination and that is not morally right.

      In order to make sure everyone is treated fairly and paid fairly we must review gender based roles and make changes. We have to get out of the mind frame that woman are incapable of doing the same jobs as men just because they are deemed weaker by society. Instead of viewing jobs as gender based we must view them based on performance and capability. We must also get rid of paying people more just because they have prior experience. Just because you have prior experience does not mean you can do the job better than someone who does not have experience.

      Doing research I came across tactics that would help me fix problems in the company. I gave out a survey so that my employees can pinpoint exactly were they think we are failing as a company and what areas do they think we are unfair. One of the biggest problems were the differences in pay. As a director i decided to conduct a PEA. PEA is a pay equity audit that compares employees doing the same work who gets paid different salaries based on work experience,credentials and job performance. Auditors look at pay differences that can not be justified. Since my company is a small organization my team and I will do the audit. Bigger companies hire consulting firms to handle their audits.

      Before we start the audit we must make sure that all the data we have is up to date so that we can make an accurate decision. In order to make sure everything is correct we must have the employees length of service,job,classification and demographic information,including gender and race. Hopefully our records are filed properly so that it makes it easier for us to go through or we will have to tidy up or records. Once that step has been completed.

      • #7580

        Sow
        Participant

        <h6>HELLO TALISHA,</h6>
        You are completely right. All is about a state of mind. The society, even women should see themselves as equal competitors with men in the labor force. Recruitment encouraging gender inequality will are not helpful, stereotypes and discriminations have to be banned from the job market.

         

      • #7587

        Nelson Sanchez
        Participant

        Hello Talisha,

        I just wanted to say this thread was amazing. I like how you put your thought into your research and expanded the pay gap conversation and split it between genders and racial equity. You really broke it down into parts and explained how pay gaps affects not only gender but how it effects the Latino and Black workforce as well. Well done Talisha!

    • #7564

      Miko Nourieli
      Participant

      If I were an HR professional tasked with figuring out how to fix pay inequality at my company I would take some steps to first figure out what the pay inequalities actually are, and what pay system to put in place that would be fair for everyone.

      First I would most likely conduct a PEA or a Pay Equity Audit, which is explained here in a quote by Harvard Business Review “a PEA involves comparing the pay of employees doing “like for like” work in an organization (accounting for reasonable differentials, such as work experience, credentials, and job performance), and investigating the causes of any pay differences that cannot be justified.” (https://hbr.org/2020/11/how-to-identify-and-fix-pay-inequality-at-your-company)

      For that I would need clear and accurate data about my employees including their demographic info as well as job experience, length of service, and job classification. Once I determined the differences in pay I would try to renegotiate employees compensation packages that needed renegotiating.  I would try to offer an increase in pay or maybe would try to have a good number of benefits that employees would be able to choose from that would help them in their personal lives or their future, such as: retirement plans, health or life insurance, educational programs, wellness programs, etc.

      I think it would be good to offer other things than just more money because everyone has a different lifestyle and want different things, not always just money. And giving them the choice would take out any bias or unfairness.  I know I would probably take a little less money if it meant I had good health insurance. I would also start to do a PEA every couple of months to ensure that everyone is receiving fair compensation for their work.

      • #7575

        Jean Muy
        Participant

        I like your take on re negotiating the employees pay based on upon many sort of factors such as job experience. It’s an idea where many organizations can do nowadays to assess where everyone at the workplace is at to make everyone’s job as equal as possible.

      • #7590

        Jaylen Santana
        Participant

        Hi Miko

        I find it really interesting how in your approach you would try your best to accommodate the employee’s needs and/or wants during your re-negotiations that would look into their future with the company which would show you care as well as the PEA’s.

      • #7634

        Zoila Cedeno
        Participant

        Hi Miko.

        I enjoyed reading your post.  I like that you indicate that sometimes it’s not all about money and that depending on their lifestyles, some people can find other benefits more important that a pay increase.  One of the positive things we can take away from Covid is the fact that many companies, who would have never allowed it previously, were forced to allow their employees to work from home.  Unfortunately, there are still so many Theory X managers out there who believe that an employee needs to be monitored to make sure that they work.   Working from home during this time has proven to many employers that while there are exceptions, most people can be trusted to do their job with minimal supervision.  I think more companies should embrace remote working, even if it was just as an alternate week type of situation.  It would reduce overhead expenses for the organization who would be able to occupy smaller offices or eliminate office space and it would reduce traveling and meal expenses for the employees.  I know many people who would take a smaller salary if it meant working remotely all the time.

    • #7567

      amadou bah
      Participant

      Pay equity is out of control across the world and big companies. because the company is not will pay females the same amount as males.  If I was an HR professional, I would ensure the gender pay equity is taking place in my organization. I would take three key areas. The transparent pay system, advocating, petition, and gather data.

      • Transparent pay system

      This means that when a male and a female are working in the same organization same role in the job. They both will receive the same payment. For example, let say Victoria and James working in this company like amazon on the customer service role. They both have the same duty on the job. Then both of them James and Victoria should get paid the same amount.

      • Advocating and petitioning

      Creating a business prepositional that helps with the issue facing both gender’s inequality of pay. The employee will sign a petition that will support the fight against company issues.

      • Gather Data

      When gathering data, you will need to include all the information on the job title, grade or level department, race, and religion, etc. finally add a payment policy of your organization’s level of experience.

      To sum up, everything that has been stated about the company needs to take a step back making sure that the organization is taking action to fix pay equity. Because whether are you a female or male if both employees do the same job, they both should get paid the same amount. It doesn’t matter your gender, race, or religion.

      https://www.thebalancecareers.com/salary-transparency-1287067

      https://www.britannica.com/topic/petition-law

      https://www.lucidchart.com/blog/pay-equity-analysis

      • #7569

        amadou bah
        Participant

        Hello Miko, I like the fact that you mention that you are going to make a clarification to the employee that job needs. and the benefit that the job comes with. because there is some company out there that does give they employee benefit.

      • #7582

        Rayon Lambert
        Participant

        Hello Amadou,

        You made some great points in your post. I found that you could have elaborate on the advocating and petitioning point. If you are looking at each point in a flow, you should gather information to confirm and verify before creating a petition; if your company has equal pay, you do not or may not need the use of advocating and petitioning.

    • #7572

      Yaritza Rendon
      Participant

      As an HR professional, if I wanted to figure out if our organization is paying its women fairly, one of the first steps I would take is to research the salaries that other organizations are offering their female employees in similar positions. The second step would be to evaluate how much the employee will cost our organization compared to the value the employee is contributing to arrive at a reasonable compensation package. (Patterson, n.d.) But it is not always about the money. We can compensate with culture. Questions to ask myself include, does my organization have a welcoming work environment? Does my organization give its women room to grow? If not, what are ways we can reset the tone? We can compensate with job benefits. Does my organization provide all female employees with health insurance, PTO, paid leave, maternity leave, or worker’s compensation? Do our female employees feel supported by the organization? Do our female employees feel like valued members of the organization? If not, what are ways we are able to show up for our female employees? (Daum, n.d.)
      <h1>References</h1>
      Daum, K. (n.d.). 5 Ways to Assess Fair Pay. Retrieved from Inc.: https://www.inc.com/kevin-daum/5-ways-to-assess-fair-pay.html

      Patterson, L. (n.d.). How do I know if I’m compensating employees fairly, in accordance with industry standards? Retrieved from Zenefits: https://www.zenefits.com/workest/how-do-i-know-if-im-compensating-an-employees-fairly-in-accordance-with-industry-standards/

      • #7574

        Jean Muy
        Participant

        I agree with your take on making sure the evaluation of employees are the best they can be since you would always need to make sure that an organization is coming out with the best people and high standards no matter what.

      • #7584

        Sow
        Participant

        I agree with you, a comparison on wages could help to determine the fairness of women’s salaries.

    • #7573

      Jean Muy
      Participant

      Being in the situation I’m currently in, I would re assure everyone at the workplace to let them know that equality across anything that goes on during work is being played out the way it should since at this point in time, this type of issue shouldn’t even be something that turns into a problem. I would need to make sure that everyone understands, both male and female, any sort of job can be taken care of by whoever gender no matter what it is. Setting out right standards to ensure everyone is being understood of what they are required to do and based upon their performance, should be credited 100% for their full efforts.

      Once you get everyone on the same page regarding the situation, it’s easier to set out a possible questionairre regarding various situations to make sure what type of responses you are receiving back from your fellow workers and setting a correct balance for each person. We would need to make sure as a whole that all the data from the surveys are tallied up correctly and being sorted to get the most accurate results from it to assess the next move into bringing equality across the workplace.

      • #7577

        Richard Ledesma
        Participant

        Hello Jean

        I totally agree and like how you would put everyone on the same page, re assuring everyone at the workplace is extremely important. Setting out the right standards to ensure everyone is being understood is another key to make the company well stabled as a whole. I like how you also said that once you get everyone on the same page, it does seem a bit easier to set out possible questionnaire, I liked your take on that especially.

    • #7576

      Richard Ledesma
      Participant

      In my ways at looking at things, I have seen the way that women get a slight portion of what a man gets. Organizations need to really look at what they are doing here with men and women. In my opinion organizations should remove gender biased amounts and amount of work in workplaces. Gender pay equity is the main point in the organization if I were the HR professional. They need to compare the pay of the employees and make it even for everyone unless you have a higher position then you deserve the most but other than that every female and male should and will get paid the same amount. With all this comes respect for the employees. Enforcing equality is a huge key to success in a business just like respect. I believe that this issue happens all across the world and huge companies and businesses. So, like I mentioned earlier I would make gender pay equity a priority in my business and organization. This shouldn’t even be an issue in the first place and now it’s become a real problem all across industries. Letting everyone know the standards of this is really important and it’s a must to let everyone know what to do and what they are doing it for based on their performance, you put in the effort and you get rewarded even if you are a male or female it shouldn’t be a problem.

      Once it is settled in the workplace and everyone is on the same page, we should and need to set a correct balance or standard balance for each person on what they provide and do in our business, if you don’t like it then your welcomed to walk out, simple as that, we must do better as a whole and be equal. We need to make sure that we are together and on the same page and bring equality across our workplace and I will do anything in my power to do this.

      • #7586

        Nelson Sanchez
        Participant

        Hi Richard,

        I read over your thread and I like how you put this together. It was well written and you covered all the points for gender equality in the workplace when it comes to pay gaps. I especially like how you explained that no position should be looked at differently when it comes to gender.

      • #7588

        Rayon Lambert
        Participant

        Hello Richard,

        Though you made an interesting point, I think there are things you should consider. As a company, the rules and policies are created to ensure pay equality. Once the rules are in place, you need to ensure that your company is doing the right thing regarding equal pay. Gathering data both in and outside of the company will help with ensuring that the company does.

      • #7605

        Teri
        Participant

        I like that you want to make sure everyone is on the same page. You want to form a team that feels appreciated and equal to one another and that is a great way to begin.

    • #7579

      Rayon Lambert
      Participant

      Pay differences between gender have been a significant issue in practically every country around the world. There was a meme that compares the highest-paid woman in the WNBA to Lebron James. The highest-paid female in the WNBA receives $221,500 while they receive over $38 million in the NBA. Knowing these facts, I would not want to have that type of issue in the company in which I have the power to help institute change or make sure it does not happen.
      One of the first things I will do is look at the company’s positions and see what men are getting paid in the company compared to women. This includes the starting salary in roles for both genders. When I research the starting pay for each gender for each position and look at the starting for each gender at the same grade, it will help me determine and clarify if we are promoting equal pay. One step I will take in making sure this is possible is by having a standard income for all people within the same positions. The pay difference will be based on appraisal and promotion pay raise requirements. But the starting salary will have a specific amount for everyone.
      Looking at other companies within the same industry as the company I am working for and comparing the employees’ pay range with the same type of position is another step I will take. By doing this, I will see if there is any difference in what women are paid in my company compared to both men and women in other companies of its type. This will help me understand what is needed to be done if there is a difference in a company of the same kind as the company I work for.
      I will also look at different job database websites like O*net and look at salary ranges. Websites like Salary.com and PayScale all talks about the difference in pay for various companies. O*net gives information on each position and the national average of each position. The use of O*net will help me understand all that is needed for a position and its average. Salary.com is another website that compares different industries in different states. It looks at the salary of companies and how they compare to the national and state average. This will help me to see what my comparison is. Are the women in my company compared equally to the national average of men? If not, I now will have to look at ways to have it rectified. Another data that I will use are reports from Payscale. Payscale is a website that creates data from different industries to compare the salary by gender, age, and race. Based on the data I gather from this website, I can now compare where my company falls compared to the pay difference and then use this to take a microscopic look at my company’s performance.
      Each avenue I will take will help me understand and verify that the company is doing the right thing by the employees to ensure gender pay equality.

      References
      Agu, N. (2021). The 20 Highest-paid WNBA players and how much they make. Retrieved from Just Richest: https://justrichest.com/the-20-highest-paid-wnba-players-in-2021-and-how-much-they-make/
      O*NET Online. (2021). Retrieved from O*NET: https://www.onetonline.org/
      Payscale. (2021). The State of the Gender Pay Gap in 2021. Payscale.

    • #7585

      Nelson Sanchez
      Participant

      For decades, Women have been treated differently in the workplace and in general in this “male dominated” world. They have always been the shadow of male figures and have never been recognized for all the efforts they made in helping the world develop. It wasn’t just males changing the world, females had a big part in that as well. From my experience in the work field I’ve noticed women being treated differently when it comes to pay gaps and acknowledgement. From sources that I viewed online, I found information from a historical view all the way to the present which can be found on https://www.striking-women.org/module/workplace-issues-past-and-present/gender-pay-gap-and-struggle-equal-pay . According to my source the causes of the pay gap were due to discrimination, undervaluing women’s skills, and Traditions/Stereotypes. As an HR professional my job is to make sure there is pay equity in the workplace.

      Three ways I will make sure that is in effect is that:

      There will be no discrimination of any kind.

      What I mean by this statement is that men or women will not be treated differently but will be treated equally in the workplace. One party will not be favored more than the other, Nobody will have privileges, and no favoritism will be allowed.

      Men and Women get the same amount of acknowledgment and performance appraisals.

      What I mean by this statement is that when men or women do outstanding work they will get the same amount of treatment when it comes to acknowledgement and performance appraisals so nobody will feel left out or feel like they aren’t bringing any value to the workplace.

      Progression and promotions will be in effect so that the workplace can adopt a moving hierarchy structure to bring in more employees.

      What I mean by this statement is that I want to provide employees the opportunity to advance in their career paths and not stay in the same position for their entire career. I want this to happen but on an equal basis meaning men and women both advance to the top with the same salary amounts and pay increases.

      • #7592

        Jennifer Baker
        Participant

        How would you ensure that there is no discrimination? I mean, it’s a lovely theory and ideal, definitely….but most companies no longer list jobs as being “$300/week for men, $200/week for women” and haven’t for decades, but the pay gap persists (and I think few companies would say “yes, we discriminate”). The difficult part is that simply saying “we will not discriminate” does not account for unconscious bias leading to additional opportunities for [white] men, greater weight given to positive performance reviews of men, the same negotiating techniques used by women seen as a negative (there’s lots of data on this; to list only one article: “Overt aggressiveness that many would consider vigorous advocacy if adopted by men, may be characterized as offensive and threatening when used by women.” https://www.negotiations.com/articles/gender-interaction/ (there are studies this is based on though I don’t have them handy right now)). Point being, there needs to be real strategy and teeth behind the Good Intent Policies or they just don’t work.

    • #7589

      Jaylen Santana
      Participant

      The first step I would take to ensure that the women in the organization were getting paid equally is to a) be transparent. One way to do this is salary transparency. Salary transparency is an approach to pay and compensation that is the exact opposite of the longstanding norm among most employers, in which what the organization pays to whom is kept largely secret. Discussing how much money we make is a cultural taboo that does not help anyone except people who want to benefit from tilted negotiations and it’s especially harmful to women.

      The second step I would take is to b) stop negotiating. The idea is to cut negotiations and insist on paying market value because women tend to negotiate less often and and end up asking for less money than men when they do. It would be much better to cut the negotiations completely and elect to pay all employees the market value for their jobs. This can be achievable by creating an equation that accounts for market value, years of experience, and location, then making this equation public to all employees and potential hires. (Using a formula like this helps prevent the wage gap before it even has the chance to take hold)

      For my source I used: https://blog.capterra.com/the-hr-professionals-guide-to-addressing-the-gender-pay-gap/

      • #7591

        Jennifer Baker
        Participant

        The no-negotiating approach I think will gain a lot of traction in the coming years. It’s still something of a hard sell and most companies don’t embrace it but I think it will become more popular. However, I think significant care needs to be taken to make clear what promotion possibilities are going forward with that – otherwise the company risks being seen as having less potential upward mobility, which would impact the percentage of top-level candidates who choose to accept offers.

    • #7604

      Teri
      Participant

      The Importance of Pay Equity (shrm.org)

      First step I would take as an HR professional would be to look up all legality regarding equal pay. Then once I am done with my research, I will initiate for salaries to be written in stone throughout the company. I feel this will give everyone a sense of security by allowing everyone to know, that everyone no matter the gender will be treated equally. Everyone will receive a salary that fits their job description, whether male or female. Same job duties and same position equals same pay.

      Second step I would take to ensure everyone is equally compensated, is to imply that when employers are giving out bonuses and pay raises they must evaluate and increase their employees salaries. Those whom work ethics are to it’s standards or greater, should be compensated the same amount of money. Although people may have different backgrounds, the job itself, duties and title are the same and it should not be viewed in any other way. At the end of the day, it is about finding individuals who view everyone equally. Individuals who know everyone should and is to be treated with the same fairness.

      My last employer made sure when we received raises, they were all equal. it was not just because we worked for it but that was his way of making sure we all felt appreciated without comparison.

    • #7631

      Zoila Cedeno
      Participant

      If I were an HR manager tasked with looking into the organization’s pay-equity situation, I would proceed to conduct an internal audit of everyone on staff to determine their job title, department, date of hire, gender, age, race, their level of experience, education, beginning salary, current salary, overtime pay, how long they’ve been with the company, how they were recruited, who performed the interviews and how hiring decisions were made. I would look through their personnel records to ascertain how often employees were evaluated during their time with the company, whether raises and bonuses were given and how often those occurred. Next, I would look at the organization’s pay policies and compare the work and pay of employees in similar positions. I would contact local recruitment agencies and research salary levels for each position on recruitment websites like indeed and Glassdoor to determine what competitors are offering employees in similar positions and what the market rate for each position is by looking at websites like O*Net. Then, I would analyze my findings to make sure that there were no obvious patterns of gender or cultural bias, pay inequality and whether the organization was meeting statutory pay levels. If any pay disparities are found, they would need to be corrected within the next payroll cycle. Lastly, I would mark my calendar to perform this analysis every year.

      I would also hold a meeting with the hiring team to make sure that everyone on the hiring team was on the same page regarding issues of diversity and personal biases. I would schedule discrimination and anti-bias training for all management positions to ensure that management personnel understand, learn to recognize how bias works, and make fairer decisions. For stereotypes and biases to be eliminated, we need to change how we think. We need to be conscious of the words we use. Different words and expressions have different meanings for different people. Become an ally for those team members who are underrepresented. Speak for someone in the moment. For example, if you are conducting a meeting and a team member is interrupted or spoken over, you can tell the person who interrupted, “I’d like to hear what they have to say”. Another option would be to go around the room and ask each person individually, “what are your thoughts or recommendations?” so that everyone can be heard.

      Gender pay gap is only of the many issues HR managers must deal with. The field of Human Resources is quickly becoming every organization’s most important tool and their first line of defense in making sure that businesses stay competitive, recruiting the best talent available while making sure companies remain compliant with labor laws to avoid costly litigation.

      https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/news/hr-magazine/summer2019/Pages/closing-the-gender-pay-gap.aspx
      https://leanin.org/what-companies-can-do-about-equal-pay
      https://leanin.org/gender-bias-cards/grid/card/set-2/1

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