Syllabus

 

BOROUGH OF MANHATTAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

City University of New York

Department of Music & Art

 

Course Title: Art History II

Course Number: ART 104

Semester: Spring 2020

Meetings: 8 – 10:45 am, F1010

Credits: 3; Class hours: 3

Instructor: Yan Yang

Office: F1109

Hours: Tuesdays 2-3, 5:45-7:15pm; Wednesdays 4-4:30 pm

E-mail: yyang@bmcc.cuny.edu

 

Course Description: This introduction to art history includes the study of painting, sculpture, architecture and other media by surveying the Renaissance period through the early 20th century using a global approach. The exploration of art and architecture in terms of historical, social, and political contexts, meaning and style will promote a general understanding of the development of art forms and style from different periods and in different cultures, as well as the effects of cultural exchanges on the arts. Discussions of techniques, media, composition, and representation will provide an understanding of key concepts in art.

 

Basic Skills: ENG-088, ESL-094, ACR-094 (no Math requirement)

 

Text for Class:

Online readings. Posted on our class website (search: Art 104 Spring 2020 Yan Yang) on OpenLab at BMCC.

 

Use of Technology: Fully wired smart classroom with computer and digital projector. You may use a laptop computer to take notes, but you must disengage the wireless and Bluetooth connections. Consider a book lamp, as the classroom can get quite dark. Blackboard will be utilized for class announcements, assignments and handouts, and images from lectures. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure he/she has access to Blackboard and that the email attached to it is correct and checked at least on a weekly basis.

 

Required assignments / grading opportunities

 

Assignment Weight                          
Discussion Circle (online) 15% of final grade
In-class writings (3 times 15% of final grade
Exams (15% midterm, 20% final) 35% of final grade
Final Project (Map Project) 20% of final grade
Engagement/Participation 15% of final grade

 

~ ~ ~

 

Schedule of Topics

 

Week Topic Highlights Do for next week
1: 1/30 Introduction Overview of class. Italian Renaissance: Rivalry between Siena and Florence. Introduction of fresco and its techniques. ·   Review: Florence in the Late Gothic Period, An Introduction

·   Review: Siena in the Late Gothic, An Introduction

·   Explore: Northern Europe: 15th Century

·   Explore: Italy: 15th Century

 

2: 2/6 Early Renaissance in Europe What is the difference between North and South Renaissance styles? Iconography. ·   Explore: Italy: 16th Century

·   Explore: Northern European: 16th Century

3: 2/13 High to Late Renaissance The Artist as the Personality. Changing markets for art (private patronage vs. commercial). Mannerism. ·   Explore: Baroque Art

 

4: 2/20 Baroque Art in Europe

 

In-class writing 1

 

The Caravaggisti, Tenebrism, Role of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation on Art. Characteristics of Baroque Art. ·   Explore: Rococo

·   Explore: Neoclassicism

 

5: 2/27 18th-century Europe and America Rococo architecture and art. Neoclassicism. ·   Study for Midterm
6: 3/5 Midterm After the midterm, discussion of final project, walking tour of neighborhood ·   Read: Arts of the Islamic World

·   Read: The Alhambra

·   Read: Taj Mahal

7: 3/12 Islamic Art Design and patterns in Islamic art. The Alhambra, Mughals and the Taj Mahal ·   Read: Imperial China

·   Read: The Forbidden City

·   Read: Chinese Porcelain

8: 3/19 Art of China

 

In-class writing 2

Confucianism, Dynastic cycles. Art of authority. ·   Read: Kamakura to Momoyama

·   Read: Edo Period

·   Read: Ryōanji

·   Read: The Great Wave

 

9: 3/26 Arts of Korea and Japan

 

 

Art of the warriors. Zen art. Woodblock prints (ukiyo-e). Korean art and its influences.

 

·   Explore: Inka Art

·   Read: Defining “Pre-Columbian” and “Mesoamerica”

·   Explore: Native North American Art 1500-present

10: 4/2 Art of the Americas North American Native American Art. Aztec Art, Machu Pichu ·   Explore: African Art since 1600

·   Read: Voyage to Rapa Nui

11: 4/23 African Art and Art of the Pacific Domestic and ritual architecture, Colonization and its effects on the art and art production. ·   Explore: Realism

·   Explore: Impressionism

·   Explore: Post-Impressionism

12: 4/30 19th-century Art of Europe and America Realism, Impressionism, Post Impressionism ·   Explore: Symbolism and Art Nouveau

·   Read: Inventing Cubism

·   Read: Fountain

13: 5/7 20th-century Global Art

 

In-class writing 3

Art Nouveau, Cubism, other “-isms” in the early 20th century ·   Explore: Global Cultures

·   Read: Contemporary Art

·   Read: Book from the Sky

·   Read: Electronic Superhighway

14: 5/14 Contemporary Art in the Global Context What is contemporary art? ·   Study for Final Exam
15: 5/21 Final Exam  

 

Assignments:

In-class Writing: writing exercises in which you will practice art historical analysis and writing.

 

Participation: engagement in class through critical thinking questions and group discussions is vital to learning. There will be many opportunities to discuss the reading, objects, and course material throughout the semester in class.

 

Discussion Circle: there will be weekly questions posted in Blackboard to which everyone should answer. Then read and respond to at least one of your classmate’s answers. There will be a total of 15 discussion posts.

 

Exams (2 total): the exams will test how much students have familiarized themselves with objects and their art historical significances. The exam will include object identification, concept definition, short answer questions using formal analysis, and essay question.

 

Final Project: Students will choose an object in the Asian context and write a short paper about it. The final version will be uploaded to a Google Map.

 

Extra Credit: The memorization of dates for the midterm and final are all extra credit.

 

 

Class Participation: Participation in the academic activity of each course is a significant component of the learning process and plays a major role in determining overall student academic achievement. Academic activities may include, but are not limited to, attending class, submitting assignments, engaging in in-class or online activities, taking exams, and/or participating in group work. Each instructor has the right to establish their own class participation policy, and it is each student’s responsibility to be familiar with and follow the participation policies for each course. BMCC is committed to the health and well‐being of all students. It is common for everyone to seek assistance at some point in their life, and there are free and confidential services on campus that can help.

Single Stop: www.bmcc.cuny.edu/singlestop, room S230, 212‐220‐8195. If you are having problems with food or housing insecurity, finances, health insurance or anything else that might get in the way of your studies at BMCC, come by the Single Stop Office for advice and assistance. Assistance is also available through the Office of Student Affairs, S350, 212‐220‐ 8130.

Counseling Center: www.bmcc.cuny.edu/counseling, room S343, 212‐220‐8140. Counselors assist students in addressing psychological and adjustment issues (i.e., depression, anxiety, and relationships) and can help with stress, time management and more. Counselors are available for walk‐in visits.

Office of Compliance and Diversity: www.bmcc cuny.edu/aac, room S701, 212-220-1236. BMCC is committed to promoting a diverse and inclusive learning environment free of unlawful discrimination/harassment, including sexual harassment, where all students are treated fairly. For information about BMCC’s policies and resources, or to request additional assistance in this area, please visit or call the office, or email olevy@bmcc.cuny.edu, or twade@bmcc.cuny.edu. If you need immediate assistance, please contact BMCC Public safety at 212-220-8080.

 

Office of Accessibility: www.bmcc.cuny.edu/accessibility, room N360 (accessible entrance: 77 Harrison Street), 212-220-8180. This office collaborates with students who have documented disabilities, to coordinate support services, reasonable accommodations, and programs that enable equal access to education and college life. To request an accommodation due to a documented disability, please visit or call the office.

 

BMCC Policy on Plagiarism and Academic Integrity Statement: Plagiarism is the presentation of someone else’s ideas, words or artistic, scientific, or technical work as one’s own creation. Using the idea or work of another is permissible only when the original author is identified. Paraphrasing and summarizing, as well as direct quotations, require citations to the original source. Plagiarism may be intentional or unintentional. Lack of dishonest intent does not necessarily absolve a student of responsibility for plagiarism. Students who are unsure how and when to provide documentation are advised to consult with their instructors. The library has guides designed to help students to appropriately identify a cited work. The full policy can be found on BMCC’s Web site, www.bmcc.cuny.edu. For further information on integrity and behavior, please consult the college bulletin (also available online).

Student Learning Outcomes Measurements
Students will be able to use basic vocabulary related to the study of visual arts and employ these terms in writing. Students will recall and define proper terminology in quizzes and exams, and use this proper terminology in informal and formal writing assignments on an artwork at a museum.
Students will develop focused observation skills and recall previously seen artworks, identify and describe features of an unfamiliar artwork, and provide comparative analysis. Students will, in quizzes and exams, class discussions, informal writings, and formal writing assignment, provide extensive visual analyses and descriptions of artworks.
Students will acquire an understanding of the historical, political, philosophical, and/or sociological context of art in different cultures and periods. ·   Students will, in quizzes and exams, answer specific questions about the historical contexts of artworks and write brief essays in that regard.

·   Class discussion of artworks presented. For a formal writing assignment, student will fully analyze an artwork observed in a museum.

Students will be able to participate in class as active listeners and work cooperatively in groups. Students will complete writing assignments in class, conduct group work and contribute to class discussions.
General Education Learning Outcomes Measurements
Arts & Humanities:

Students will be able to develop knowledge and understanding of the arts and literature through critiques of works of art, music, theatre or literature.

Students will write a formal paper about an artwork in a museum in which they describe the artwork’s formal features and discuss it in relation to its historical and social context.
Pathways Student Learning Outcomes for

Creative Expression

Measurements
Students will be able to gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view. Students will be able to, in quizzes, exams, class discussions, and formal/informal writing assignments (journals, visual analyses, and in class writing on assigned readings), synthesize information from readings, individual research, lectures, and museum visits to show understanding of historical contexts and critical reception of artworks.
Students will be able to evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically. Students will be able to discern arguments, analyses, and biases in assigned readings and individual research to discuss issues of style, iconography, and context in class, in essay exams, and in formal writing.
Students will be able to produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions. ·   Students will be able to provide analysis of style and context in discussions and informal writings cued to images presented in class.

·   In a formal writing assignment, students will provide extensive visual analysis of an artwork from a local museum using research gathered from scholarly sources and comparison of other artworks.

Pathways: Additional Student Learning Outcomes Measurements
Students will be able to identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring creative expression, including, but not limited to, arts, communications, creative writing, media arts, music, and theater. ·   Students will recall artist, title, and historical period of artworks in quizzes and exams.

·   In quizzes and exams, students will discuss form, style, and major concepts and context of artworks.

·   Class discussion will allow students to observe, compare, and fully analyze artworks presented.

·   In informal writings cued to images presented in class and to course readings, students will provide basic visual analyses discussing style, context, and technique, as well as critical analysis.

·   In a formal writing assignment, students will provide more extensive visual analyses of an artwork experienced at a local museum discussing style, context, and technique, and the critical reception of the object through a study of its historiography.

Students will be able to analyze how arts from diverse cultures of the past serve as a foundation for those of the present, and describe the significance of works of art in the societies that created them. ·   Student will, in quizzes and exams, answer specific questions about the historical contexts of artworks and write essays on visual art produced from diverse cultures and periods to see its progression throughout the globe from the Renaissance to the 20th Century.

·   In a formal writing assignment, students will analyze an artwork in a museum to discover the influences surrounding its function and the visual elements displayed.

Students will be able to articulate how meaning is created in the arts or communications and how experience is interpreted and conveyed. Students will demonstrate, in class discussions and informal/formal writing assignments, an understanding of the various techniques, styles, and concepts related to artworks in different historical eras, and how these works were received and interpreted to fulfill particular functions.
Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the skills involved in the creative process. Students will, in quizzes and exams, discuss the form, style, and major concepts of specific artworks, while exploring the education/training of artists, the creative process for individual artists, and develop an understanding of the technical aspects of painting, sculpting, designing architecture, and other media.

Introductions

 

Hi everyone my name is Shaquille Edwards I was born in Jamaica. when I was 8 years-old me and my family move to the United States I currently live in Staten Island, New York. my short-term goal is to finish college and my graphic novel. my long-term goal is to create my own Animation Studio

home work 4

  1. Organic solidarity is most likely to exist in which of the following types of societies?
  • Industrial 

 

  1. According to Marx, the _____ own the means of production in a society.
  • Bourgeoisie

Introduction

Hi, my name is Guadalupe Ramirez. My major is Multimedia Programming and Design and this is my last semester in BMCC. I’m twenty-two years old, turning twenty-three in a few days. I was born here in New York City, but when I turned 13 years old my parents took me to Mexico, and I had to live and study over there. I came back to New York when I turned 18 years old and began to work and study. At first I wasn’t sure what field to approach so I had a Liberal Arts major. From here I’m planning on moving to Texas and pursuing a Bachelors degree. As for now, I want to be a programmer, either creating/fixing websites or something in that field.

home work for 4/7

Janel Johnson

Why do groups exist and What are the types of groups that exist in a society?

Groups exist because it gives you a good feeling that someone else feels the same way you are feeling. It’s a sense of belonging to something. Being a part of something  you can relate to. Some of the groups that exist in society are religious groups(Christianity, Muslims , voodooism etc) we also have ethnicity groups like race, (black, Asian, Caucasian).

Where do you prefer to shop, eat out, or grab a cup of coffee? 

I prefer to shop and eat from people of my culture because that’s what I’m used to. Also I like fresh food so i’m grocery shopping. I would rather go whole foods, trader Joe anywhere but with fresh organic products. I am not really a coffee person so i’ll usually make my tea at home. My decisions are based on good quality and you know good quality by the taste and looks of things.

 

Share some of your social group affiliation and roles with a group. What is the purpose of this group and what role do they play in terms of your personal development, socialization or what contributions has this group made to the community or society at large?

The  only group i can say i’m pretty much in is Christianity, which is breaking down to different parts and I am part of the Pentecostal group. The purpose of Pentecostal is to praise God freely with joy, with dance and songs.  It helps bring people closer to God and also a good therapy when people are going through hard times. Christian jobs are to help each and everyone that needs help that’s what we contribute to society, spread love and acceptance.

Class wiki

hello world!

home work for 4/7

Janel Johnson

Why do groups exist and What are the types of groups that exist in a society?

Groups exist because it gives you a good feeling that someone else feels the same way you are feeling. It’s a sense of belonging to something. Being a part of something  you can relate to. Some of the groups that exist in society are religious groups(Christianity, Muslims , voodooism etc) we also have ethnicity groups like race, (black, Asian, Caucasian).

Where do you prefer to shop, eat out, or grab a cup of coffee? 

I prefer to shop and eat from people of my culture because that’s what I’m used to. Also I like fresh food so i’m grocery shopping. I would rather go whole foods, trader Joe anywhere but with fresh organic products. I am not really a coffee person so i’ll usually make my tea at home. My decisions are based on good quality and you know good quality by the taste and looks of things.

 

Share some of your social group affiliation and roles with a group. What is the purpose of this group and what role do they play in terms of your personal development, socialization or what contributions has this group made to the community or society at large?

The  only group i can say i’m pretty much in is Christianity, which is breaking down to different parts and I am part of the Pentecostal group. The purpose of Pentecostal is to praise God freely with joy, with dance and songs.  It helps bring people closer to God and also a good therapy when people are going through hard times. Christian jobs are to help each and everyone that needs help that’s what we contribute to society, spread love and acceptance.

Class wiki

hello world!

[[the other page]

Where to get the best palachinka

List of best palachinka places in Plovdiv:

  1. Unassuming place by the pedestrian bridge
  2. Palachinka place by the djumaya
  3. Workshop of the Happy Pancakes

Running Vocabulary List

Add vocabulary from the readings you think it is important to know. Include definitions with references if you are able. This is a collaborative document for members of our class.

Gender  – gender as the same as sex; gender as different than sex; gender as the assignment of meaning to bodies.

Dominance – the power and right to make decision or give commands

Masculine – someone or something associated with men