RSS SCOTUSblog

  • From 9th grade study hall to the Supreme Court June 22, 2021
    Anna Salvatore started High School SCOTUS as a way to explain the Supreme Court’s work to high schoolers. After early success, the site has blossomed into a nationwide publication pulling in high school journalists from across the country – students like freshman Elise Spenner. Salvatore and... The post From 9th grade study hall to the Supreme […]
    SCOTUStalk
  • Court requires religious exemption but leaves many questions unanswered June 22, 2021
    This article is the final entry in a symposium on the court’s decision in Fulton v. City of Philadelphia. Holly Hollman is general counsel and associate executive director of Baptist Joint Committee for Religious Liberty. In Fulton v. City of Philadelphia, the court came to... The post Court requires religious exemption but leaves many questions […]
    Holly Hollman
  • Justices curb securities-fraud class actions, albeit gently June 22, 2021
    The Supreme Court’s Monday decision in Goldman Sachs Group v. Arkansas Teacher Retirement System will not be remembered as one of the court’s seminal securities cases. Indeed, it might not even change the result in the case before it. But it does provide another chapter... The post Justices curb securities-fraud class actions, albeit gently appeared […]
    Ronald Mann

Welcome to Constitutional Law (CRJ200) Course Hub

Course Description

This course hub website contains OER (Open Educational Resources)/Zero Textbook Cost resources for faculty teaching U.S. Constitutional Law (CRJ 200) at the Borough of Manhattan Community College. These resources are freely available for use by BMCC faculty and beyond. This work was created by Daniel DiPrenda, and funded by the New York State Department of Education. 

This course provides a historical overview of the relationship of the states to the Bill of Rights, and how the U.S. Supreme Court has interpreted the powers of the federal government. The effect of the due process clause of the fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the states is examined through a study of the leading Supreme Court decisions related to criminal justice. Topics include characteristics and powers of the three branches of government, the principles governing the operation of the Bill of Rights, and the variables affecting the formulation of judicial policy.

This course hub follows Professor DiPrenda’s syllabus, located here.